Saturday, January 11, 2014

Why I Am Not A Fan Of The Gastric Bypass Procedure

gastric-bypass-surgery


Over the years, I have worked with hundreds of individuals whom I have attempted to get into shape, and I have met a few who have had gastric bypass to lose weight. The results? They have gained most of their weight back or they are in and out of the hospital with some type of bowel ailment or other health issues. It has also been documented that some of the people who have had this weight loss procedure, have traded in one addiction, which is food, for another addiction.

Why Bypass Surgery?

When someone tells me they are considering the procedure, I usually ask them why. Can't they do it on their own? The usual answer is they have tried several diets and nothing works; therefore, this is their last hope. I understand that diet alone may not be the ultimate answer for people who are morbidly obese; but how about addiction counseling? I am talking about behavioral disorder as opposed to a food specific concern. Those who fail repeatedly at losing weight may need a treatment that combines counseling and controlled deprivation, just as they do with people who are addicted to alcohol. Should employers suggest to someone who is obese and unhealthy to consider counseling or would that be considered discriminatory or a violation of that person's civil rights? 

A lifelong commitment

Seeing people I know reclaim their initial weight in a matter of months or traveling in and out of doctors' offices because of complications from gastric bypass surgery, made me question this approach to weight loss. Of course, there are people who get this done without any side effects. But I believe the decision to go the gastric bypass surgery way should not be taken lightly. Weight loss, no matter how it is done, is a lifelong commitment to eating well enough to optimally sustain the functions of the body. Coupled with regular exercise, a sensible diet will help maintain a healthy body weight.

Do you know of anyone who has had the surgery, experienced no complications whatsoever, and kept the weight off? Have you had this surgery and have you kept the weight off? If so, what lifestyle changes did you make to keep the weight off?


Another great article to read:
Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous




12 comments:

  1. Thanks for posting on this important topic. Several years ago a friend of mine had this procedure. She lost about 70 pounds, but then stalled out and but was still overweight. Four years later, she went in for surgery for another issue, and the surgeon discovered that gangrene had developed in the suture area of the previous surgery site. She died the same day, leaving two children.

    Another acquaintance of mine was considering this procedure - and told me that she had three friends who had died following the procedure.

    I know a few people right now who are in the honeymoon stage after this surgery - lots of weight loss, apparent health improvement, and seem happy that they did it. But even some of those are suffering from severe exhaustion. It takes a few years often for the bad side effects to manifest.

    A whole foods, balanced, vegan diet can produce substantial weight loss without hunger or cravings (btdt!) with none of these dangers.

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    1. Sorry to hear about your friend. I don't think that people really know about the bad side effects people are getting from doing this procedure. Personally, when someone asks me about it now, I try my best to tell them to go another route on their weight loss journey.

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  2. To be perfectly honest, I don't know a single person who has had weight loss surgery and managed to lose weight and keep it off successfully. Unfortunately I know a LOT of people who've done the gastric bypass and the banding. Most have ended up in pain after almost every meal (even years after the surgery) and throw up on a regular basis or have ended up back on the table to have the band removed or further surgery to try to fix what gastric bypass has ruined. I was determined to stay away from it myself - I was an ideal candidate at 152kg and fairly young and healthy. But my issue was not because I was eating, it was WHY I was eating. That needs to be addressed before any weightloss by any method will stick.

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  3. Thank you for sharing your thoughts... I was honestly on the fence about the procedure before, but if it's contingent upon a lifelong lifestyle change, I can see how the results are not sustainable. Great post! :)

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  4. I do know 2 people who had it and they are both dead from complications. The complications didn't happen right away, they experienced problems years down the road. One person's liver stopped working! Don't do it.

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  5. I also know a few people who have had gastric bypass and are back at the same weight they started. Thanks for posting, it's important for people to know both sides!

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  6. I don't know anyone who's had this surgery but I've never liked the idea of it.
    As someone who was once overweight, I'm glad I didn't take the easy way out (not surgery in this case, but any kind of a crash diet) because I most likely would have gained all the weight back. I wasn't morbidly obese and I can only imagine how they desperately want to lose weight but people have to commit to making a permanent lifestyle change, and also need to be patient. Not to sound harsh but they didn't get to that size overnight.

    Great point about counselling and approaching obesity it like the addiction that it is.

    P.S. Wow, I didn't realise complications from gastric bypass were this common.

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  7. I agree that gastric by pass is not the best choice. I had a friend that had it and got an infection afterwards - it almost killed her. She has lost a lot of weight since, but almost lost her life too. I believe that if you do have the surgery on definitely need some kind of counseling to help make sure you know what emotional issues you are dealing with too. Visiting from Workout Wednesdays WOW link up!

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  8. As someone in the fitness industry myself, I agree with you 100%. I've always though of the surgery kind of like taking steroids in that both get you fast results, but don't give you time to adapt appropriately physically or mentally. What makes me really sad is when I see doctors on the news commenting on how this really is the only option for many people and how risk free it is. In fact, it is not risk free and is neither the only nor best option for most people. Thank you for this post and spreading some truth about the surgery!

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  9. Wow, I did not know that the side of effects often lead to death! I do know a woman who had the surgery and she has kept the weight off for years. I haven't asked her what was her key to success.

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  10. Quite disturbing. I would consider/invest in counseling, a health nutritionist and a physical trainer before I would do anything this drastic. I know of someone who wants to undergo the surgery but she has every health issue under the sun. She would most likely succumb to the negative effects. Thank you for sharing this important information.

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    1. It is a well kept secret in the industry. Thanks for stopping by.

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